Visiting motorcycle museums is a fascinating walk through the timeline of motorcycle history, with an incredible array of bikes, memorabilia, and publications on display. Many motorcycle museums are directed by nonprofit foundations and hold special motorcycle raffles at least once a year. Following are four museums you don’t want to miss.

Image to the left taken from the Motorcycle Hall of Fame website.

Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum:

The Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum opened in 1990 in Westerville, Ohio. In 1999, it moved to Pickerington, Ohio, the home of the American Motorcycle Heritage Foundation. Not only does the AMHF run the museum, but it also preserves motorcycling’s history, participates in research, and creates educational programs.

The museum features exhibits on dirt racing, Ohio-made Hondas, and classic bikes. The Hall of Fame exhibit celebrates prominent figures in motorcycling, and the Founders Hall recognizes those who contributed to the museum. The museum is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week, and is closed New Year’s Day, Easter, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day.

National Motorcycle Museum:

Founded in 1989, the National Motorcycle Museum is located in Anamosa, Iowa, and is open seven days a week. During the summer, its hours are Monday through Sunday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and during the winter, it is open Monday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The museum is operated by a nonprofit entity and has over 300 motorcycles on display. Exhibits include the lives of Arlen Ness and Evel Knievel, motorcycle movies such as “Easy Rider,” and antique motorcycles and other vehicles. A visit to the website’s tour page gives you just a glimpse of the incredible displays.

Image to the left taken from the Wheels Through Time Museum website.

Wheels Through Time Museum:

Located in Maggie Valley, North Carolina, the Wheels Through Time museum displays over 300 American vintage motorcycles from manufacturers such as Harley-Davidson, Indian, Henderson, and Excelsior. Other exhibits include a chopper graveyard, board track racing, and police motorcycles. The museum houses tens of thousands of motorcycle photos, parts, artwork, and artifacts.

Founded in 1993, the museum is open Thursday through Monday from April through October, and its gift shop sells clothing, posters, DVDs, and other memorabilia. The website offers videos, virtual tours, and glimpses behind the scenes.

Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum:

In 1989, George Barber wanted to preserve global motorcycle history and began collecting motorcycles and other vintage vehicles from around the world. In 1995, his collection opened to the public in Birmingham, Alabama, and today the museum has over 1200 motorcycles as well as rare and unusual cars, including the largest collection of Lotus racecars in the world.

The Barber museum is open year-round, closed only on major U.S. holidays. It holds special events such as the Barber Vintage Festival, a celebration of all things motorcycle, including a parts swap meet and motorcycle auction. The Barber Motorsports Park in Birmingham holds shows and events from spring through fall, and the Barber Vintage Museum Library holds over 6,000 books and motorcycle magazines.

Have you been to one of these museums, and what was your favorite exhibit or memorabilia? As South Carolina motorcycle accident attorneys, we always find the innovations in safety particularly fascinating.

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